Dispatch from Marfa

Dispatch from Temple Shipley: Marfa, Texas**

Over the course of the late 1970s through early 90s, Donald Judd managed his artistic practice from the remote west Texas town of Marfa. Working as an architect, furniture designer, critic, and rancher.

Following a productive period of creation in his five story cast-iron studio on Spring Street in New York’s Soho, Judd and his family relocated to Marfa. Adapting a series of abandoned US Army buildings, Judd created a home for an impressive collection of sculptural works. Judd’s dedication to the arts is visible on the Judd and Chinati Foundation tours of his home, offices, and studios in Marfa. 

   
  
 
 
  
    
  
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 September 10, 2015: A selection of Dan Flavin sculptures were on view in the first floor gallery of Judd’s Spring Street Studio, operated by the Judd Foundation in New York. The gallery hosts a rotating selection of artwork from Judd’s collection.

September 10, 2015: A selection of Dan Flavin sculptures were on view in the first floor gallery of Judd’s Spring Street Studio, operated by the Judd Foundation in New York. The gallery hosts a rotating selection of artwork from Judd’s collection.

    
  
 
 
  
     
  
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       October 11, 2015: Rarely open to the public, the interior of Judd’s Architecture Studio in Marfa exhibited a selection of drawings for Judd’s design for a new façade for the train station in Basel. Interestingly, Switzerland’s Basel is home to the world’s most prestigious art fair, which like today’s Marfa, attracts an unusually international clientele to a small, relatively sleepy town.

October 11, 2015: Rarely open to the public, the interior of Judd’s Architecture Studio in Marfa exhibited a selection of drawings for Judd’s design for a new façade for the train station in Basel. Interestingly, Switzerland’s Basel is home to the world’s most prestigious art fair, which like today’s Marfa, attracts an unusually international clientele to a small, relatively sleepy town.

   
  
 
 
  
    
  
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    On view in Judd’s Architecture Studio at 102 North Highland Avenue in Marfa: Wooden water bottles designed by Judd to capitalize on the abundance of spring water available in west Texas. After use, these water bottles would be used as building blocks in construction.     

On view in Judd’s Architecture Studio at 102 North Highland Avenue in Marfa: Wooden water bottles designed by Judd to capitalize on the abundance of spring water available in west Texas. After use, these water bottles would be used as building blocks in construction.

 

   
  
 
 
  
    
  
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    A quiet moment in the gymnasium before the commencement of the Chinati Foundation’s annual benefit dinner

A quiet moment in the gymnasium before the commencement of the Chinati Foundation’s annual benefit dinner

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    Temple advises art collectors on contemporary art acquisitions and collection management. Born and raised in Dallas, she moved to Oak Cliff after studying architectural history at the University of Chicago. She can be found driving on long stretches of highway or playing with her puppy at the dog park.

Temple advises art collectors on contemporary art acquisitions and collection management. Born and raised in Dallas, she moved to Oak Cliff after studying architectural history at the University of Chicago. She can be found driving on long stretches of highway or playing with her puppy at the dog park.

**Temple will be posting Dispatches from her travels all fall, sharing snippets of the amazing places she visits.

Temple Shipley

Dallas, Tx

Temple advises art collectors on contemporary art acquisitions and collection management. Born and raised in Dallas, she moved to Oak Cliff after studying architectural history at the University of Chicago. She can be found driving on long stretches of highway or playing with her puppy at the dog park.